What Is Sonia Sotomayor Religion?

Sonia Sotomayor belongs to the Catholicism religion. Western philosophy, culture, art, music, and science have all been affected by the Catholic Church including the Judge. Through missions and diaspora, Catholics can be found all over the world.

President George H. W. Bush nominated Sotomayor to the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York in 1991, and she was confirmed in 1992. President Bill Clinton nominated her to the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in 1997. The Republican majority in the United States Senate hindered her nomination, but she was finally confirmed in 1998.

Sotomayor served on the Second Circuit for almost a decade, hearing appeals in over 3,000 cases and writing over 380 decisions.  Sotomayor has taught at Columbia Law School and New York University School of Law.

Sonia Sotomayor Ethnicity: Family Background

Sonia Sotomayor belongs to the Hispanic and Latina ethnicity.

Sotomayor is the Supreme Court's first woman of color, Hispanic, and Latina member. Sotomayor was born to Puerto Rican parents in the Bronx, New York City. Her father died when she was nine years old, and she was raised solely by her mother.

Her mother was Celina Báez, an orphan from Santa Rosa, Lajas, and her father was from San Juan, Puerto Rico. She felt the most connected to her grandma, whom she subsequently described as a source of protection and purpose. At the age of seven, Sonia was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and began receiving daily insulin injections. When she was nine years old, her father died of heart difficulties at the age of 42.

Sotomayor went to Blessed Sacrament School in Soundview for elementary school. In 1972, she graduated as valedictorian and passed the Cardinal Spellman High School admission exams.

Sonia Sotomayor Origin

Sotomayor was born to Puerto Rican parents in the Bronx, New York City. Her father died when she was nine years old, and she was raised solely by her mother. Sotomayor earned her bachelor's degree from Princeton University in 1976 and her law degree from Yale Law School in 1979, where she worked as an editor at the Yale Law Journal.

She spent four and a half years as an assistant district attorney in New York before going into private practice in 1984. She was a member of the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund, the State of New York Mortgage Agency, and the New York City Campaign Finance Board's boards of directors.